Crawven Case: The Mistake (#68)

On 20th December, 2038, a few months after his imprisonment, Juergen Crawven escaped the Jyamen Prison in Iam, Dezo. He had hatched an elaborate escape plan with the help of the most feared terrorist organisation in the world: The Him-Uq.

Once he was caught, Germany cut all ties with Crawven and therefore, a furious Crawven started planning with the Him-Uq to escape the prison and then take revenge on Big City and Germany. After a lot of help with the world’s best lawyers and an extraordinarily good behaviour in prison, Crawven got lucky by being granted a pardon. He was then sent off to the Jyamen Prison in Iam, Dezo which was seen as a controversial decision as the prison was not one of the most secure as not many high-profile prisoners were kept there. The jailers got a call from Bunty Amarnathpo himself in the early hours of 20th December, 2038 which told him to release Crawven or else he would be shot right then and there. Even though there was no shooter near the jailer, he still gave an accurate description of what the jailer was doing right then in order to scare him.

This had been done with the help of Juergen Crawven who was using a morse code device which he had assembled himself in the prison by smuggling the parts over a period of 2 weeks. The morse code was connected with a radio frequency connected with the Him-Uq. The Him-Uq and Crawven had hatched the escape plan even before he was caught as a “standby”.

Bunty continued to give a description of what the jailer was wearing that day and what he looked like using Crawven’s description. The freaked out jailer let out Crawven almost immediately but then once he was released and had left the prison complex, he went into a bathroom and the jailer called in reinforcements to catch Crawven. Soon, the city was on high-alert and a nationwide search for the escaped convict began.

Streets were searched, houses were searched, posters were put up and helicopters were sent out. The jailer knew that the caller was Bunty as he had told the jailer so himself in order to scare him even more. The CCTV cameras had all been shot and the real-time footage-saving databases had all been corrupted with a message saying –

Hello,

You will never find me.

Love,

Crawven and the Him-Uq

The chilling message was one of the biggest mistakes made by the Him-Uq and Crawven, the message hadn’t hidden its IP Address well enough maybe because it was written in a bit of a hurry as there were about to escape.

Big City’s Government & Citizen Security Hacking Body (GCSHB) got onto the job and fairly easily, they were able to find the IP Address and realised it was written from a mobile phone which was still being carried by the terrorists. They tracked down the phone and the car too.

The police cars caught the Him-Uq SUV while it was crossing the state border and immediately shot down the tyres. The SUV opened fire on the officers who replied with more firing, they exchanged fire for a almost 4 minutes in which unfortunately, one police officer was killed. A helicopter shot one of the shooters from the air when it arrived and very soon a lot of backup arrived and the terrorists and Crawven himself was overpowered. Many people were angry at the police for not getting enough backup at the beginning such as a helicopter which could’ve saved the martyred officer’s life.

All the information was extracted from the terrorists and Crawven before they were once again, sentenced to death. The death sentence was carried out by a firing squad which was the first time in 8 years and was only done for particularly heinous crimes. The execution was carried out just a week later.

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